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Students Write About Time - The Lake & Park Times Online Edition - by Eileen


Primary students created timelines of the history of time telling devices.

At the Lake and Park School we like to pay attention to the rhythm of the changing seasons of the year. From the fall harvest of our garden to that first warm spring day when we might head down to the beach or just bring bubbles out to the patio, the way we spend our time acknowledges this cycle.  At the same time we are committed to providing the opportunity for everyone to see and think about things in different ways. The holiday season is a time of rich potential. Some years we study traditions that come from different winter holidays. This year we decided on a focus that would highlight mathematical thinking: the concept of time. As one calendar year ended and another began we wondered how people throughout history have kept track of the transitions. Classes thought of different ways to measure time, did a lot of work understanding what a circle is, and the various ways to determine a circle’s circumference.  The younger students played with geometry, and counted by fives, as some children learned to tell time with a clock. We had hoped that the topic would give rise to some philosophical pondering, but the richness and depth of the  conversations that came up again and again surpassed our expectations. This led to some wonderful story writing and poetry, including ideas from some of the older children that delve into logic. Please enjoy the student writing which follows.




The study began with an investigation of circles using the whole body and many different materials.





Hoops


Pattern blocks



Arcs


Print making with a variety of circles.


Exploring with Spirograph.






Beginning Room students used quiet time to explore the nature of circles.












Metaphors about time by the Intermediate Students


Time is like space, it is infinite.

Time is like a circle, it never ends.

Time is like a never ending line, it keeps going forward, never back.

                                                          -Max B.





Time is like the sea.

From when the first cell in the sea to the animals now,

It took time to evolve and grow,

From sea to land and sometimes land to sea.

How did that cell get here?

Time is like a game of circles

For a circle to turn, time is required,

10-20 years of 24 hours go by while a circle is spinning,

Hours and hours of day, to your year older mark,

It all takes time.

When did time start and when will it end?

                                           ~Rees





Time is Beautiful

Time is like a song, when

You’re older you hear a song and it takes you back

In time to when you were small.

Time is like a light, it never runs out

Because you can keep charging it.

Time is like a cloud, it can change the big picture.

Time can take a different path.

Time is like a garden, it grows into something beautiful,

Just like children blossom into adults.

                                                          ~Ruby






Time is like a fountain.

Gushing out ideas, events and questions.

Being reused and refilled, remade and redone.

Discovered and forgotten.

Understood and questioned.

Time is like a fountain.

                                                          ~Delphine






Time is like a corkboard. People use it for different things.

Some people have great memories.

Time is all memories.

                                                          ~Harriet

Time is like a piece of paper.

It is used over and over,

Recycled and reused.

It is kept alive because of its usefulness to people.

                                                          ~Harriet






Classes explored Deep Time with visiting scientist Mary Fisher through our collaboration with NCSE Teach.



Each single change in the DNA chain represents about 5 million years.



Revisiting what we learned about whales in a new context.


Rich debate and discussion accompanied the challenge of creating

an evolutionary tree of mammals.



Creating a model of the evolutionary tree of mammalia.